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Addiction Counselling - Short Course

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Addictions are more than simply having a strong desire for something. They change an individual's behaviour so that they must satisfy their addiction. This is why the term 'dependence' is often used. Research using brain imaging has demonstrated that addictions alter brain structure and function. It's perhaps not surprising then that many people find it so difficult to overcome their addictions.

Addictions can cause immense unhappiness for those who have them, whether through personal experience or because friends or family suffer from them. This short course is designed to appeal to anyone who works with people who have problems with addictive behaviours from drugs and alcohol through to shopaholics. Many types of addiction are covered and the process of addiction is explained both behaviourally and physiologically. A variety of counselling methods and techniques are also reviewed so that students should be able to develop different solutions to help those whose lives are affected.   

 
How do our short courses work?


As you progress through each lesson; you will be provided with a range of ways you can expand your learning. By choosing what tasks you do and don't undertake; you can expand in areas that interest you most, and skip areas of less interest.

You won't miss anything important that you need to know about stress management though; so long as you read the notes that are presented alongside these "learn more" suggestions.

At the end of each lesson, you will be given a short interactive test to undertake, which will provide an indication of how your learning is progressing.  Upon completing the very last lesson, you will be offered a more thorough automated test or examination. This final assessment can be undertaken at any time of day or night; and any day of the week; and if you achieve an overall pass; you will be able to obtain a "certificate of completion".

 

Lesson 1 DRUG AND ADDICTION COUNSELLING


Neurotransmitters and Neurons
The Reward System
Tolerance
Withdrawal
Dependence
Substance Abuse Review what you have been learning

 

Lesson 2 TYPES of ADDICTION 

Biological Influences
Psychological Influences 
Alcohol
Tobacco 
Caffeine 
Behavioural Addictions

Lesson 3 ADDICTIONS & COMORBIDITY 

Social Anxiety 
Negative Reinforcement
Personality Issues
Wernicke-Korsakoff’s Syndrome
Cognitive Deficits
Alcoholic Hallucinosis
Suicide Risk
Cannabis Use
Other Substances

 

Lesson 4 ALCOHOL USE AND DEPENDENCE 

Foetal Alcohol Syndrome
Alcohol Withdrawal
Driving
How Long Does Alcohol Stay in Your Bloodstream?
Machinery/Accidents at Work
Hospitalisations
Relationships
Crimes
Physical Health
Mortality

Lesson 5 COUNSELLING THE INDIVIDUAL WITH ALCOHOL RELATED PROBLEMS 

Assessing the Drinker
Drinking History
Motivational Interviewing
Drinking Diary
Hazardous Drinking
Higher Risk or Harmful Drinking
Dependent Drinking
Topirimate
Baclofen
Naltrexone
Disulfiram (more commonly known as Antabuse)
Campral
Ondansetron (Zofran)
Chantix
Gabapentin
Extended Brief Intervention
Family Therapy
Group Work
Multicultural Differences

Lesson 6 SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE 

Caffine
Cannabis
Hallucinogens
Inhalants
Heroin
Sedatives
Anti Anxiety Drugs
Stimulants
Cocaine
Metaphetamines
Club Drugs
Tobacco

Lesson 7 COUNSELLING THE INDIVIDUAL WITH SUBSTANCE RELATED PROBLEMS 

Motivational Enhancement Therapy
Medication
Behavioural Therapy
Residential Treatments
Other Treatments
Cocaine Addiction

Lesson 8 COUNSELLING FOR ADDICTIVE BEHAVIOURS 

National Problem Gambling Clinics (UK)
Gamblers Anonymous
Gamcare (UK)
Shopping Addiction/Omniomania

Lesson 9 THE HEALTHCARE TEAM SUPPORT NETWORKS AND SPECIFIC GROUPS 

Doctor
Drugs Key worker
Government, Charity and Private Treatments
Outreach services
ECT – Electro Convulsive Therapy
Family Support
Review what you have been learning

FINAL ASSESSMENT 

Learn about Different Types of Addiction First then Learn to Help Addicts Deal with their Addiction

The types of substances which people may become dependent upon include illicit drugs (cannabis, heroin, cocaine, etc.) and legal drugs (alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, over-the-counter medications and prescription medications). There are also behaviours which induce similar highs to substances and which can also become addictive, which we’ll come to later. (However, whilst some drugs are illegal in some countries, they are not in others.)

DRUGS OF ADDICTION

There are many different substances which people can become dependent upon. Anyone who develops a use disorder to a substance will use that substance in excess. Currently, those substances for which there are recognised mental health disorders include:

  •  Cannabis
  •  Hallucinogens
  •  Inhalants
  •  Opioids (synthetic medications similar to opiates)
  •  Sedatives, Hypnotics and Anxiolytics
  •  Stimulants
  •  Alcohol
  •  Tobacco
  •  Caffeine
  •  Other, unknown substances

Whilst many people often use more than one substance, a diagnosis is usually made on the basis of the substance which is considered the most important one to the person. The DSM-IV used the term ‘poly-substance related disorder’ to refer to those who have more than one prevalent substance use disorder or who use indiscriminately, but the most recent DSM suggests to record each diagnosis of a substance use disorder separately.

Hallucinogens include psychedelic drugs like LSD (lysergic acid dyethylemide) and mescaline. Inhalants are drugs which are sniffed. They can include drugs such as amyl nitrate which is volatile at room temperature when exposed to air, as well as aerosol and glue vapours which are often sniffed from polythene bags.

Opioids are synthetic medications which are used to treat pain. Examples include oxycodone, hydrocodone and hydromorphone. These are very similar to opiates like morphine and heroin in their action on the nervous system but they are not derived from opium. Sedatives, hypnotics and anxiolytics are depressants - they are said to produce a ‘downer’. Sedatives are tranquilisers intended to reduce overactivity or irritability. Benzodiazepines are an example. Alcohol produces similar effects.

Hypnotics are intended to induce sleep and are also known as sleeping pills. Anxiolytics are intended to reduce anxiety symptoms.

Stimulants include many drugs which produce an ‘upper’ or stimulating effect on the central nervous system. Effects include wakefulness, alertness and increased heart rate. Many drugs like caffeine for instance can induce these effects but from a substance use disorder perspective this group includes
the likes of amphetamines and cocaine.

WHY DO PEOPLE TAKE DRUGS?

When we look at addictions to substances one of the first questions which springs to mind is “Why do people take drugs?” As we have already seen, one of the reasons is because they can get ‘high’ but is that why all people take drugs? The answer, of course, is no. In fact, the first time of taking a substance such as nicotine, opiates or alcohol can be dysphoric and even cause nausea, yet people often take it again.

People may take drugs to overcome psychological or physical pain. They may take them to treat diseases, or to try and gain insight into the human condition through altered states of consciousness. Sometimes people want to move from a depressed state of mind to a less depressed one or from a negative state of mind to a less negative one. The effects of any given drug for each person can be quite different.

Another reason people may take drugs is because they are available. Some, like alcohol and nicotine, are freely and legally available. Others have developed dependence to prescribed medications. In particular, many people became addicted to opioids and barbiturates prescribed by doctors in the early part of the twentieth century, and later to benzodiazepines.

WHAT WILL YOU GET FROM THIS COURSE?

At the end of the course you will be able to describe the main addictive substances; you will understand how these chemicals act in the body, what the effects are and the behaviour changes. You will also learn where to find resources and services to help those drug addicts.

 

Example Pages from the Study Guide

 



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Addiction Counselling - Short Course Addiction Counselling - Short Course
£100.00 In stock